Tag: Medi-Cal





Top 10 Workouts for Seniors with Hypertension

Posted by: Carl Dameron    Tags:      Posted date:  April 9, 2024
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Safe Workouts for Seniors in Managing Hypertension

As we age, staying active becomes crucial for our overall health. For seniors dealing with hypertension in their advanced years, exercising safely and effectively is vital. Physical activity can help eliminate and manage high blood pressure, improve heart health, and boost overall well-being. Here are the top 10 safe and effective workouts recommended for seniors with hypertension. 

 10 Safe Workouts for Seniors:

  1. Walking: Walking is a great exercise that’s easy on your joints. It’s a simple way to get active. Try to walk briskly for about 30 minutes on most days. Being consistent is essential. But if 30 minutes seems like too much, start with shorter walks. Then, slowly increase the duration. This way, your body gets used to it, and it feels easier over time.
  1. Swimming: Water exercises are remarkable for older adults with high blood pressure. Swimming laps or joining water aerobics gives your whole body a great workout without causing any strain on your joints. The way the water supports your body also eases the pressure on your muscles, making it easier and safer to move around. This gentle and effective exercise in the water is a fantastic choice for seniors with hypertension.
  1. Cycling: Whether pedaling on a stationary bike inside or cruising outdoors, cycling is an excellent way for seniors with hypertension to pump their hearts. It’s gentle on the joints and won’t strain or hurt them. Plus, the best part is that they’re in charge! They can decide how fast or slow they want to go. When they begin, they should take it in a friendly and easy way, and as they get more comfortable, they can add more time and speed to their rides. This way, they can enjoy the ride and feel good about getting more robust with each pedal.
  1. Yoga: Yoga is a fantastic exercise involving gentle movements that stretch and strengthen your body. It also focuses on breathing in a way that helps you relax and reduce stress. Certain yoga poses, like the mountain pose, where you stand tall and strong, the seated forward bend stretching your back, and gentle twists that help your body feel more flexible can benefit seniors with high blood pressure. These poses are simple and can be adjusted to suit your comfort level. Doing yoga regularly helps you feel calmer and more relaxed while also helping with managing your blood pressure.
  1. Tai Chi: Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese practice passed down through generations, focuses on slow, graceful movements and deep breathing. The gentle flow of Tai Chi movements is like a soothing dance, promoting better balance, flexibility, and relaxation for seniors. This exercise isn’t just about physical activities; it’s also about finding peace within yourself. Plus, Tai Chi can reduce high blood pressure and strengthen your heart. So, it’s good for your muscles and joints, kindness, and overall health.
  1. Resistance Band Exercises: Resistance bands are like stretchy ropes that help you get stronger without making your body work too hard. Older adults can do many exercises using these bands to strengthen different muscles. You can improve your arm muscles (like lifting a grocery bag), boost your legs (like climbing stairs), and even sit down while strengthening your back muscles. These bands are gentle but mighty!
  1. Pilates: Pilates is a kind of exercise that pays a lot of attention to making your mid-region strong, helping you to bend easily, and keeping your body in a good position. It’s a workout that doesn’t stress your body and can be changed to fit what you can do. Doing Pilates can make you better at balancing and staying steady, which is essential for older people with high blood pressure.
  1. Chair Exercises: For seniors who like to or need to exercise while sitting down, chair workouts are a fantastic choice. These exercises cover a wide range, from simple leg lifts to gentle arm circles, all of which can be done comfortably from a seated position. They’re fantastic for improving strength and flexibility without needing to stand up or put pressure on your joints. They’re tailored to keep you comfortable while making a big difference in how strong and flexible you feel.
  1. Strength Training: Light weights or everyday items found in the home, such as water bottles or cans, can be helpful for strength training. These makeshift weights are perfect for exercises focusing on significant muscles like the arms, legs, and core. However, ensuring your weights are not too heavy or uncomfortable is crucial, especially for seniors with hypertension. Choosing safe and easy-to-handle weights is essential to prevent strain or injury while working out.
  1. Mindfulness and Meditation: Mindfulness and meditation can be super helpful for seniors dealing with high blood pressure. These stress-busting methods can play a significant role in keeping blood pressure under control. Relaxing your mind and body can make a real difference in managing hypertension and staying healthy. So, even though they’re not the typical workouts, these calming practices can significantly help seniors.
Albert Arteaga, M.D., President of LaSalle Medical Associates.

Albert Arteaga, M.D., President of LaSalle Medical Associates.

Before starting any new exercise routine, seniors with hypertension should consult their healthcare provider. Additionally, here are some essential tips to ensure a safe and enjoyable workout experience:

  • Stay hydrated throughout your exercise sessions.
  • Warm up before exercising and cool down afterward to prevent injury.
  • Listen to your body, and don’t push yourself too hard.
  • Monitor your blood pressure regularly, especially before and after workouts.
  • Wear comfortable clothing and supportive footwear.

Seniors with hypertension | LaSalle Medical Associates

At LaSalle Medical Associates, we understand the critical role of staying active in managing hypertension among seniors. Pay attention to the power of regular exercise in controlling blood pressure and enhancing overall health. Discover enjoyable activities tailored to your fitness level –the key to making a difference in hypertension management and improving your quality of life.

Remember, starting your journey towards an active lifestyle is never too late. Explore various exercises to find what suits you best. Prioritize your well-being by listening to your body and consulting our healthcare professionals before starting any new workout routine. Your health and safety matter most as you progress towards a healthier, more vibrant life. Contact us for your well-being now!

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to more than 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

 





Women Deserve the Best Healthcare

Posted by: Carl Dameron    Tags:      Posted date:  March 19, 2024
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: Barbara Bell, Kathleen Dameron, and Maria are women who face a range of health concerns throughout their lives.

Barbara Bell, Kathleen Dameron, and Maria are women who face a range of health concerns throughout their lives.

 

“Women can lower their risk of poor health by making healthy lifestyle choices, such as maintaining a balanced diet and regular exercise regimen.” — Albert Arteaga, M.D.

REDLANDS, CALIF. —  In the past few decades, medical research primarily involved studies with male participants, as stated by the Cleveland Clinic. This Women’s History Month, it is important to focus on women’s health and take a closer look at their specific health issues.

Women are at a higher risk for heart disease and breast cancer, which are among their top health concerns.

Dr. Albert Arteaga, President of LaSalle Medical Associates, says, “Women can lower their risk of poor health by making healthy lifestyle choices, such as maintaining a balanced diet and regular exercise regimen.” He endorses the National Institutes of Health‘s (NIH) recommendations for women to follow. They include:

  • Set short-term goals to achieve and maintain a healthy diet and exercise routine.
  • Try to be physically active for at least 30 minutes on most or all days of the week.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.
  • Choose foods that are low in added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium.
  • Pick whole grains and lean sources of protein and dairy products.
  • Practice all four types of exercise: endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility.

Women face a range of health concerns throughout their lives. Some of these include premenstrual syndrome (PMS), birth control, and menopause. Different age groups come with different health problems. However, lifestyle choices play a vital role in mitigating these risks and enabling women to lead the lives they desire.

As the Mayo Clinic puts it: “Irrespective of your age, healthy lifestyle choices can significantly lower your health risks and help you live the life you want.”

In 1993, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) began to require the inclusion of women and racial and ethnic minorities in the clinical research studies it funds. Before that time, clinical trials often excluded those populations.

Since 2016, NIH policy now states that “Sex is a biological variable that must be considered in the design of clinical trials, right from the start.”

As research has continued, two lifestyle factors have emerged as important to women’s health: diet and exercise. The NIH’s National Institute on Aging says that taking a consistent approach to healthy diet and exercise choices can do much to ensure a healthier tomorrow.

“Women who follow these recommendations will enjoy better health in both the short and long term,” says Dr. Arteaga.

For more information go online to lasallemedicalassociates.com.

Shaila Dameron says she eats plenty of fruits and vegetables.

Shaila Dameron says she eats plenty of fruits and vegetables.

Photo Caption: Shaila Dameron says she eats plenty of fruits and vegetables.

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.

BRIEF: 310 words

Women Deserve the Best Healthcare

“Women can lower their risk of poor health by making healthy lifestyle choices, such as maintaining a balanced diet and regular exercise regimen.” — Albert Arteaga, M.D.

REDLANDS, CALIF. —  In the past few decades, medical research primarily involved studies with male participants, as stated by the Cleveland Clinic. This Women’s History Month, it is important to focus on women’s health and take a closer look at their specific health issues.

Women are at a higher risk for heart disease and breast cancer, which are among their top health concerns.

Dr. Albert Arteaga, President of LaSalle Medical Associates, says, “Women can lower their risk of poor health by making healthy lifestyle choices, such as maintaining a balanced diet and regular exercise regimen.” He endorses the National Institutes of Health‘s (NIH) recommendations for women to follow. They include:

  • Set short-term goals to achieve and maintain a healthy diet and exercise routine.
  • Try to be physically active for at least 30 minutes on most or all days of the week.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables.
  • Choose foods that are low in added sugars, saturated fats, and sodium.
  • Pick whole grains and lean sources of protein and dairy products.
  • Practice all four types of exercise: endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility.

Women face a range of health concerns throughout their lives. Some of these include premenstrual syndrome (PMS), birth control, and menopause. Different age groups come with different health problems. However, lifestyle choices play a vital role in mitigating these risks and enabling women to lead the lives they desire.

As the Mayo Clinic puts it: “Irrespective of your age, healthy lifestyle choices can significantly lower your health risks and help you live the life you want.” The NIH’s National Institute on Aging says that taking a consistent approach to healthy diet and exercise choices can do much to ensure a healthier tomorrow.

“Women who follow the NIH recommendations will enjoy better health in both the short and long term,” says Dr. Arteaga.

For more information go online to lasallemedicalassociates.com.

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About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.





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Carrots and applesauce make a sweet treat that’s good for your eyes.

Carrots and applesauce make a sweet treat that’s good for your eyes.

“Carrots are a good source of Vitamin A, which is known to improve eye health.” — Albert Arteaga, M.D.

REDLANDS, CALIF. —  During April, we celebrate International Carrot Day. The old saying about carrots being good for your vision is true. Carrots have nutrients that help eye health in several ways. Chief among them is Vitamin A.

“Carrots are a good source of Vitamin A, which is known to improve eye health,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, President of LaSalle Medical Associates, one of the largest privately owned and operated healthcare organizations in the Inland Empire.

The 2023 Digital Health Award-winning Internet site, All About Vision, says that the Vitamin A in carrots provides several benefits, including:

On the other hand, vitamin A deficiency can cause:

  • Dry eyes
  • Night blindness
  • Vision loss

“Parents who have children who don’t like the taste of raw or cooked carrots by themselves may be able to get their kids to eat them by combining carrots with other foods that are rich in Vitamin A and add sweet-tooth-pleasing flavors, such as mangoes, cantaloupes, sweet red peppers, and sweet potatoes,” said Dr. Arteaga.

Carrots also contain beta-carotene, which is what gives red, orange, and yellow vegetables their color. Once eaten, your body converts it into retinol, another name for vitamin A. Healthline points out that research shows that beta-carotene is also good for your skin and may even improve cognitive health, although more research is needed about that.

Dr. Arteaga adds one caution: If you eat too many beta-carotene-rich foods, your skin may start to turn yellow. “All things in moderation,” he says.

“It is recommended that both children and adults undergo an annual check-up. At LaSalle, the checkup includes a comprehensive blood workup that can identify any vitamin deficiencies. This enables doctors to provide tailored suggestions regarding medicine, diet, and exercise that are specific to the needs of each patient,” explained Dr. Arteaga.

For an appointment at one of the six Inland Empire LaSalle clinics, please visit LaSalleMedicalAssociates.com or call 1-855-349-6019.

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.





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When youngsters get enough sleep, they are less impulsive, stressed, depressed, anxious, and aggressive, and can keep their cognitive functions working to their full capacity, like these award-winning young scholars. Shaila and Shiane Dameron are happy healthy LaSalle patients.

When youngsters get enough sleep, they are less impulsive, stressed, depressed, anxious, and aggressive, and can keep their cognitive functions working to their full capacity, like these award-winning young scholars. Shaila and Shiane Dameron are happy healthy LaSalle patients.

Children and teens, especially, need adequate sleep for proper growth and development.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga

REDLANDS, Calif. — Sleep is crucial for maintaining good health and well-being throughout your life, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. “The quality of your waking hours largely depends on what happens while you’re asleep.”

“For proper growth and development, children and teens require 10 to 12 hours of sleep per night. Therefore, parents are encouraged to do their best to ensure that their children get enough rest,” said pediatrician Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates, one of the Inland Empire’s largest private healthcare organizations.

Signed into law by Governor Gavin Newsom in 2019, California now requires all high schools to start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. and an 8 a.m. or later start for middle schools this school year.

Having schools start their day later in the morning is based on sleep studies that have shown developmental and educational problems arise due to inadequate sleep.  This an attempt to help teens get more sleep,” said Dr. Arteaga.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) studies show that pre-teens who slept less than nine hours per day had differences in brain structure and more problems with mood and thinking than those who got adequate sleep. Improving sleep leads to better mental health and behavior from pre-adolescence on.

NIH researchers “found that children in the insufficient sleep group at the start of the study had more mental health and behavioral challenges than those who got sufficient sleep. These included impulsivity, stress, depression, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and thinking problems.

“The children with insufficient sleep also had impaired cognitive functions such as decision-making, conflict-solving, working memory, and learning. Differences between the groups persisted at the two-year follow-up.”

After awakening, the body releases hormones that increase alertness. With developing pre-teens and teens, hormones act while sleeping in pulses that signal the body to release testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone. Those essential developmental hormonal pulses get bigger with the onset of puberty.

Adults as well as youngsters are subject to many of the same problems in the absence of adequate sleep. These problems include hunger control, responsiveness to insulin, a decline in physical activity, and what is known as metabolic syndrome—a cluster of conditions that increase one’s risk “…of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes,” according to the Mayo Clinic.

The Mayo Clinic and Dr. Arteaga suggest six ways to improve one’s sleep. First, stick to a regular schedule, going to bed and waking up at the same time each day. “For adults, seven hours is the minimum and eight is recommended,” said Dr. Arteaga.

Second, avoid eating large meals close to bedtime. Avoid midnight snacks and late-night alcohol. Nicotine is another no-no.

Third, the bedroom should be comfortably cool, dark, and quiet. “It is difficult to fall asleep after being exposed to blue-light-emitting sources like computers, smartphones, and other devices,” said Dr. Arteaga.

Fourth, “Napping during the daytime needs to be limited, as too many or too long naps will interfere with nighttime sleep,” said Dr. Arteaga.

Fifth, don’t be a couch potato. “It is recommended to engage in some form of physical activity every day. However, it is not advisable to exercise right before bedtime as it can be counterproductive,” said Dr. Arteaga.

And finally, learn to cope with stress and anxiety. “Rehashing daytime troubles is guaranteed to keep you from the restful sleep you need to cope with them the next day. You can use a notebook or planner to list things you need to pay attention to the next day and that lets your mind disengage from them at bedtime,” said Dr. Arteaga.

He added, “If you or your children are having sleep problems anyway, it’s a good idea to call your doctor and ask for a referral to a sleep specialist. They can suggest additional practitioners or prescribe medications to help.”

For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.





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Nuts and seeds in moderation are good for your health.

Nuts and seeds in moderation are good for your health.

“Adding both nuts and seeds to your diet provides a tasty way to give your body the nutrients it craves.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga

REDLANDS, Calif., Feb. 14, 2024 — Going nuts can be good for your health, providing you with plenty of healthy protein, fiber, and nutrients that your body craves. Howard LeWine, MD, Chief Medical Editor for Harvard Health Publishing, points out that these tasty little treats contain plenty of healthy nutrients.

LeWine notes that “peanuts and pecans contain lots of B vitamins; almonds are rich in calcium and vitamin E; walnuts have lots of folates, vitamin E, and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, an omega-3 fatty acid). And all nuts have magnesium.”

Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital, says, “In just a handful of nuts, which is about an ounce or a quarter of a cup, you get a lot of bang for the buck. They contain anywhere from 3 to 7 grams of protein per ounce, 1 to 3 grams of fiber, and 160 to 200 calories.”

“Adding both nuts and seeds to your diet provides a tasty way to give your body the nutrients it craves,” said Albert Arteaga, MD, President of LaSalle Medical Associates, one of the Inland Empire’s largest privately owned healthcare organizations.

LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Albert Arteaga

LaSalle Medical Associates CEO Dr. Albert Arteaga, M.D.

“Many nuts are the seeds of certain fruits, and it turns out that seeds like flaxseeds, chia seeds, sesame seeds, and pumpkin seeds are also very healthy.” Dr. Arteaga adds one cautionary note: “Don’t overdo it. A handful or two a day is fine, but more than that adds calories that aren’t good for your waistline.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) hosts extensive databases packed with nutritional information about nuts and seeds. Among the nutrients that they provide are magnesium to control blood pressure and bone health; potassium for heart and kidney health; zinc—essential for normal growth and development; iron to support the hemoglobin that carries oxygen to your lungs and other body cells; and vitamin C for the immune system, and to help protect against lead exposure.

A healthy diet such as the Mediterranean Diet recommends avoiding saturated fats and taking in unsaturated fats. The USDA Food Composition Database tells us that walnuts supply 16 grams of unsaturated fat versus only 2 grams of saturated fat. For almonds, the ratio is 12.5 to 1, cashews 10 to 2, raw peanuts 11 to 2, chia seeds 7 to 0, and sunflower seeds 12 to 1.5.

“Adding nuts and seeds to your daily diet is both delicious and healthful,” says Dr. Arteaga. “Just be sure that, like all good things, enjoy them in moderation.”

For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc. is one of the largest independent and Latino-owned healthcare companies in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. The corporate office is in Redlands.

LaSalle is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals, and clinics, delivering high-quality patient care to over 350,000 patients in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino and Tulare counties.





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Helen Robinson and LaSalle patient Carl M. Dameron plan for Valentine’s festivities. Carl plans to buy a box of chocolates for his sweetheart, but wonders which one is healthy? Photo by Carl M. Dameron.

Helen Robinson and LaSalle patient Carl M. Dameron plan for Valentine’s festivities. Carl plans to buy a box of chocolates for his sweetheart, but wonders which one is healthy. Photo by Carl M. Dameron.

“Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

REDLANDS, Calif., Feb. 10, 2024 — Not all sweets are created equal, and knowing the good, the bad, and the ugly can affect your sweetheart’s health, for better or worse. Few people are aware that the cocoa used to make chocolates and other sweets that include chocolate may include potentially toxic levels of lead and cadmium.

Consumer Reports (CR) published two studies investigating the presence of heavy metals in chocolates. Of the brands they tested, a 2023 study found “a third of chocolate products are high in heavy metals.” CR tested 48 different products, including cocoa powder, chocolate chips, chocolate bars, mixes for hot chocolate, brownies, and cakes.

Brands included Hershey’s, Ghirardelli, and Nestlé; retailer house brands from Costco, Target, Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Whole Foods; and specialty brands Droste and Navitas.

Dark chocolates have higher percentages of cocoa than milk chocolates, but “…every product we tested had detectable amounts of lead and cadmium,” according to James E. Rogers, Ph.D., CR’s director and acting head of product safety testing.

Paradoxically, dark chocolate confections that have 70% or higher concentrations of cocoa are considered healthier than treats with lower concentrations because of their powerful antioxidant effect, which contributes to a lower risk of heart disease and enhanced brain function, according to Healthline. But higher cocoa content also means more heavy metals!

Different chocolatiers manufacture their products using cocoa from different countries. The soil that provides nutrients to the cocoa plants is also the source of unhealthy concentrations of the heavy metals that end up in the cocoa beans.

Milk chocolates do not contain worrying amounts of these metals. But milk chocolates don’t contain healthier levels of antioxidants. So, what is a Valentine’s Day gift giver to do? Consumer Reports studies are available to subscribers, but if you are not a subscriber, you will need to go online to third-party reports.

Here are two online resources that are not behind a paywall: Food Revolution Network, a nonprofit health-oriented website (https://foodrevolution.org/blog/heavy-metals-in-chocolate/); and Forbes magazine (https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2022/12/16/23-of-28-dark-chocolate-bars-tested-have-high-lead-cadmium-levels/?sh=309bb8421640). You can also enter “heavy metals in chocolates” in your web browser for a complete list of resources.

“Do your sweetheart a favor,” says Dr. Arteaga, “and if you give chocolates, choose brands without toxic levels of heavy metals. Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day. Perhaps consider giving flowers or a fruit basket.”

For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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BRIEF: 278 words

Keep the Lead OUT of Your Sweethearts Valentine’s Day Treats

“Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day.” — Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

REDLANDS, Calif., Feb. 10, 2024 — Not all sweets are created equal, and knowing the good, the bad, and the ugly can affect your sweetheart’s health, for better or worse. Consumer Reports (CR) studies tested 48 different products, for the presence of lead and cadmium in 2023.

Brands included Hershey’s, Ghirardelli, and Nestlé; retailer house brands from Costco, Target, Trader Joe’s, Walmart, and Whole Foods; and specialty brands Droste and Navitas. Consumer Reports found that “…every product we tested had detectable amounts of lead and cadmium,” according to James E. Rogers, Ph.D., CR’s director and acting head of product safety testing.

Paradoxically, dark chocolate confections that have 70% or higher concentrations of cocoa are considered healthier than treats with lower concentrations because of their powerful antioxidant effect, which contributes to a lower risk of heart disease and enhanced brain function, according to Healthline. But higher cocoa content also means more heavy metals!

So, what is a Valentine’s Day gift giver to do? Consumer Reports studies are available to subscribers, but if you are not a subscriber, you will need to go online to third-party reports. Forbes magazine does a good job of reporting the findings:  (https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2022/12/16/23-of-28-dark-chocolate-bars-tested-have-high-lead-cadmium-levels/?sh=309bb8421640).

You can also enter “heavy metals in chocolates” in your web browser for a complete list of resources.

“Do your sweetheart a favor,” says Dr. Arteaga, “and if you give chocolates, choose brands without toxic levels of heavy metals. Choose the right sweets for your sweetheart on Valentine’s Day. Perhaps consider giving flowers or a fruit basket.”

For more information go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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Shiane, Shaila, Carl And Malaika Jacocks all enjoy the Gold Standard of Care at LaSalle Medical Associates.

Shiane, Shaila, Carl, and Malaika Dameron all enjoy the Gold Standard of Care at LaSalle Medical Associates.

“We not only need more Black physicians, but we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

REDLANDS, CA. — A 2022 study by Pew Research finds that most Black Americans feel good about the quality of health care they have received recently. But the findings are mixed, with 47% saying outcomes have gotten better over the past 20 years, 31% saying they’re the same and 20% feel things have gotten worse.

On March 29, 2023, the Kaiser Family Foundation released a study, “Key Data on Health and Health Care by Race and Ethnicity” that noted, “While inequities in access to and use of health care contribute to disparities in health, inequities across broader social and economic factors that drive health, often referred to as social determinants of health, also play a major role.”

Social determinants include “socioeconomic status, education, neighborhood and physical environment, and social support networks, as well as access to health care.” Several initiatives within and outside of the healthcare system are working to address these factors.

Nonetheless, two things not mentioned in these studies need to be pointed out. Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates, the Inland Empire’s largest independent healthcare provider, said, “We not only need more Black physicians, but we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly.”

Dr. Arteaga points out that it is only natural that Black patients will feel more comfortable being treated by a Black physician.

A 2021 study from the National Library of Medicine found that 5.8% of family medicine doctors are Black, 7.8% of internal medicine specialists, and 7.3% of pediatricians.

Blacks make up 13.6% of the U.S. population, so the number of Black physicians is under-represented.

Dr. Arteaga adds that a key factor in patient satisfaction with their healthcare provider is trust. “At LaSalle,” commented Dr. Arteaga, “we address this in several ways.

“One is that when we open a facility, it stays open in the same location. Our Black and Hispanic patients know that the LaSalle clinic they visit is going to be in the same place for the long term. Our patients trust that their LaSalle facility isn’t going to move. We opened our first clinic in Fontana in 1984 and it’s still in the same location,” he continued.

LaSalle employs a diverse staff who all provide a Gold Standard of care for their patients. Part of that lofty standard includes communicating effectively and openly with patients. The old saw about “bedside manner” includes the style of a person’s communication with others, per Merriam-Webster, and LaSalle’s staff are skilled at providing a good bedside manner.

“Another thing our patients can count on is that their health care provider won’t change. We don’t believe in transferring staff from one location to another. The relationship a LaSalle patient has with their doctor won’t be interrupted because of some HR policy that moves providers around.

“Lastly, our facilities are scrupulously clean. We maintain a Gold Standard of cleanliness in all our clinics that match our Gold Standard of care for all patients, regardless of their racial or ethnic background.”

Dr. Arteaga emphasized, “We encourage anyone who feels uneasy about communicating with their health care provider to contact their insurer and ask for a different doctor. Good communication is so important a part of good healthcare, no one should be going without it.”

For more information call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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B R I E F: 291 words

How to Eliminate Black Disparities in Healthcare

“We not only need more Black physicians, but we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly,” says Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates.

REDLANDS, CA. —A 2022 study by Pew Research finds that most Black Americans feel good about the quality of health care they have received recently. But the findings are mixed, with 47% saying outcomes have gotten better over the past 20 years, 31% saying they’re the same and 20% feel things have gotten worse.

A 2023 study by the Kaiser Family Foundation noted, “While inequities in access to and use of health care contribute to disparities in health, inequities across broader social and economic factors that drive health, often referred to as social determinants of health, also play a major role.”

However, Dr. Albert Arteaga, Chair of LaSalle Medical Associates, points to two things not mentioned in these two studies—the need for more Black doctors and better communication between doctors and patients. “We not only need more Black physicians, we also need both doctors and patients to communicate more openly,” he said.

LaSalle provides a Gold Standard of care to all its patients, regardless of race or ethnicity. This includes communicating effectively and openly with patients. A good “bedside manner” includes communication style with others, per Merriam-Webster, and LaSalle’s people practice a good bedside manner with everyone they see.

Dr. Arteaga emphasized, “I encourage anyone who feels uneasy about communicating with their health care provider to contact their insurer and ask for a different doctor. Good communication is so important a part of good healthcare, no one should be going without it.”

For more information call 1-855-349-6019 or go online to LaSalleMedical.com.

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